Medical Exams for Canadian Immigration: Step-by-Step Guide

Just like in many other places that admit immigrants and foreign workers and students, Canada requires that those who enter the country be subject to medical tests.

This ensures that before granting appropriate visas or permanent residence status, newcomers are physically fit to perform their work, do not pose as a health threat to Canadian population, and do not require significant amount of healthcare resources that is primarily intended for Canada’s citizens and permanent residents.

When is a medical test required

In most cases, once an applicant is invited to apply for permanent residence, he or she is required to take a medical exams. This means that if an applicant is just in the initial phase of the application such as reviewing the requirements or preparing to create his/her Express Entry profile, the applicant doesn’t need to get a medical test. But it helps a lot to ensure he or she is physically fit and does not suffer from chronic disease when he or she applies as an immigrant. Otherwise, it might be a waste of the applicant’s time and effort if in the end, the application be refused because of health reasons.

An applicant can get his or her medical exam before or after his/her application, depending on the program being applied for. Instruction guide on when to take the medical exam can be found within the immigration program.

Blood pressure equipment and medication. Photo credit: Stevepb / Pixabay

Which health professionals can perform medical exam

Applicant must see a doctor on the list of panel physicians. Doctors or medical clinics whose names are not allowed to take the medical exam for Canadian immigration purposes.

That being said, the panel physician doesn’t make the final decision about his or her medical test results. An appropriate Canadian government agency makes that decision. In case there’s a problem with an applicant’s medical exam, Canadian authorities will contact him or her.

Find a panel physician to do the medical exam.

Before submitting an application

The primary applicant may choose to have his or her medical exam up front before submitting the application for permanent residence. This is also known as upfront medical examination.

However, if bringing other family members in the application, it is advisable to wait for further communication from Canadian authorities before going to a panel physician or visiting a clinic for health check. Typically, instructions are sent to the primary applicant on how to get the medical exam done. This requirement must be fulfilled within 30 days of receiving the instructions. Failure to follow the instruction will likely mean refusal of the application.

What to bring in a medical exam

On an applicant’s appointment for medical exam in a designated clinic or physician, he or she must bring the following:

  • proper identification (at least one document with photograph and signature, such as a passport, driver’s license or national identity card)
  • eyeglasses or contact lenses, if applicable
  • any medical reports or test results that the applicant had for any previous or existing medical conditions
  • the Medical Report form (IMM 1017E), if applicant didn’t receive an upfront medical exam, this will be sent to him or her
  • a list of current medications, excluding vitamins and health supplements

Applicant must also bring 4 recent photographs if the panel physician doesn’t use eMedical. Contact the panel physician prior or bring the photographs if unsure.

The applicant may be referred for an x-ray or other laboratory tests.

Expected expenses

The applicant is expected to pay all fees related to the medical exam on the appointment day. The fees include:

  • the fee for the doctor or radiologist
  • any special tests, investigations or treatment needed
  • any specialists an applicant is required to see

In case the application is unsuccessful after submission of medical exam results, the applicant is not expected to receive a refund of the costs and expenses related to the medical exam.

Refugees and asylum seekers are exempt from paying the fees.

What to expect during medical exam

Reminder: Only an approved panel physician or designated clinics can perform a complete medical exam for immigration reasons.

Identification

Upon arrival, the physician or clinic staff will ask for an applicant’s identification to verify identity. A photograph of the applicant is taken and attached to the his or her medical records.

Medical questionnaire

The doctor will fill out a medical history questionnaire and ask the applicant questions such as family’s health background, history of surgery, admission to hospitals and so on. This questionnaire helps ascertain previous or existing medical conditions. They’ll also ask the applicant about any medications he or she is currently taking.

Honesty is important so be sure to tell the panel physician about any previous or existing medical conditions. Medical exam procedure may take longer if applicant does not disclose any existing health condition.

Physical examination

The applicant will be asked to undergo a physical exam. In this step, the doctor or a clinic staff will obtain the following information about the applicant:

  • weight
  • height
  • hearing and vision
  • blood pressure
  • pulse
  • heart and lungs
  • abdomen
  • limbs
  • skin

The doctor or medical clinic staff won’t examine genitals or rectal area as these parts of the body aren’t required for the immigration medical exam.

Blood pressure equipment and medication. Photo credit: Stevepb / Pixabay

The doctor may need to examine the female applicant’s breasts. Prior to doing this, they will provide the applicant with an explanation of why and how the examination is being done.

Right to a chaperone

The applicant has the right to a chaperone at any time during the entire medical check up. This means that the applicant can request for a medical staff to accompany the physician to conduct a test, stop the exam and ask question about the procedure.

The applicant may also be asked to do chest x-rays and laboratory tests at the clinic or a laboratory. This is routine screening and the doctor will discuss any abnormal results.

Further tests

Depending on the results of initial tests, the applicant may be referred to a specialist for more testing. Such requests must be completed as soon as possible to avoid delays in the processing of the medical examination.

After medical exam

Once the exam is done, the physician will send the results directly to the Canadian authorities. The doctor will give the applicant a document confirming that a medical exam has taken place. This document should be kept as proof.

Submitting medical exam results in application

If the applicant had an upfront medical exam before sending in his or her application, he or she must include a copy of the IMM 1017B Upfront Medical Report form with the application.

If the panel doctor works with eMedical, they’ll give the applicant an information sheet print out to include with the application.

If applicant had his or her medical exam after submitting the application, he or she doesn’t need to send any document pertaining to the test.

If the applicant wants a copy of the medical exam, he or she can ask the doctor during the medical exam. Once submitted, medical reports and x-rays for the medical exam become the property of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and cannot be returned to the applicant.

Validity of exam results

The medical exam results are valid for 12 months only. If the applicant doesn’t come to Canada as a permanent resident within that time, another exam may be necessary.

Next steps

Applicant will have to wait for the notification from the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada for further action.

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