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What To Do When You are Hit by Company Job Lay Off

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Redundancy and layoff are terms that are used to describe the process of terminating employment due to business reasons. These reasons include downsizing, restructuring, or a decrease in demand for a particular product or service.

Redundancy vs Layoff

Layoff is the termination of employment due to lack of work or a business restructuring. Redundant is when a job or employee is eliminated because their skills and/or duties are no longer needed. Layoffs are often used as a costcutting measure, while redundancy is considered a more humane way to reduce the workforce.

In both cases, the affected employees are usually eligible for certain benefits, such as unemployment benefits or redundancy. In addition, they may have the right to be offered alternative employment within their company if it is available. It’s important to note that the specific terms and conditions of redundancy or layoff can vary depending on the employee’s contract of employment and the circumstances surrounding the termination of employment.

Importance of understanding this change in job status

Understanding the redundancy and layoff process in the UK is important for several reasons.

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  1. To qualify for redundancy pay, employees must have at least two years of service with their employer.

  2. There are some categories of employees who may not be eligible for redundancy pay, including agency workers and those on fixed-term contracts.

  3. Employees may only be made redundant if there is a genuine business reason for their dismissal. This could be a reduction in the workforce, a reorganization, or the closure of the company.

  4. Redundancy pay may not be available to employees if they are able to find alternative employment within the same organization.

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  5. The employer must use fair selection criteria in order to decide which employees will be made redundant. This includes performance, skills, and experience if more than one employee is being laid off.

In summary, understanding the redundancy and layoff process in the UK is important for both employees and employers, as it helps to ensure that everyone is aware of their rights and responsibilities and can plan for the future in an informed and proactive manner.

Company notice to layoff workers

In the UK, employees are typically notified of layoffs through a meeting with their employer or a written notice.

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During a meeting, the employer will inform the employee of the reasons for the layoff and the terms and conditions of the termination of employment. This includes the effective date, any severance pay or other benefits, and the availability of alternative employment, if applicable.

If the notification is in writing, it will typically be in the form of a letter that outlines the same information as a meeting. The letter should also include details of the employee’s right to appeal against the decision, if applicable.

Regardless of the method of notification, it is important for employees to carefully review the information provided and seek legal advice if they have any concerns or questions. It is also advisable for employees to keep a copy of any written notification for their records.

The minimum notice period for redundancy in the UK is determined by the employee’s length of service to their employer, as outlined in the Employment Rights Act 1996. The minimum notice periods are as follows:

  1. At least one week’s notice after one month’s service for up to two years.

  2. One week’s notice for each year of service, up to a maximum of 12 weeks, after two years of service.

It’s important to note that an employer may give more notice than the minimum required by law. In addition, an employee may also agree to a shorter notice period if they choose to do so.

In some circumstances, an employer may pay an employee in lieu of notice. This means that the employee is paid their wages for the notice period instead of working during that time. This should be outlined in the employee’s contract of employment or agreed upon between the employee and employer.

Sample computation of redundancy pay in UK

Let’s consider an employee named John who is 45 years old and has worked for his company for 10 years. John’s weekly pay is £500.

Using the formula outlined above, John’s redundancy pay would be calculated as follows:

  1. John has worked for 10 years, so he is entitled to 1.5 weeks’ pay for each complete year of service over the age of 41.

  2. The total amount of redundancy pay he is entitled to would be calculated as 10 years x 1.5 week’s pay per year = 15 week’s pay

  3. John’s weekly pay is £500, so the total amount of redundancy pay he would receive would be: 15 week’s pay x £500 per week = £7,500

  4. The statutory maximum amount of redundancy pay is capped at £16,320, so John would receive the maximum amount of £7,500.

It should be noted that this is just an example, and the specific details of an employee’s redundancy pay will depend on their individual circumstances, such as their length of service, weekly pay, and age.

Employees are advised to seek professional advice, such as from a solicitor or an employment law specialist if they have any questions or concerns about their redundancy pay or rights.

Getting support when you lose your job

There are several forms of support available to a laid-off employee in the UK, including:

  1. Jobseeker’s Allowance: This is a form of financial support for those who are unemployed and actively looking for work. Eligible individuals can claim Jobseeker’s Allowance for up to six months, and the amount they receive will depend on their circumstances and national insurance contributions.

  2. Universal Credit: This is a means-tested benefit that provides support for those on low income, including those who are unemployed. Universal Credit can provide financial support for living costs, housing, and childcare expenses.

  3. Training and retraining support: The UK government offers several schemes to help individuals who have been laid off to retrain and find new employment. This includes the National Careers Service, which provides information, advice, and guidance on training and retraining opportunities, as well as the Re-Train program, which provides funding for training courses.

  4. Career advice and support: There are several organizations in the UK that provide career advice and support to those who have been laid off, such as the Citizens Advice Bureau and the Jobcentre Plus.

  5. Employee Assistance Programmes (EAPs): Some employers may offer EAPs, which provide support and advice to employees who have been laid off, including financial and legal advice, counseling, and support in finding new employment.

  6. Trade unions: If the worker is a member of a trade union, they can seek advice and support from their union representative.

  7. Employment Law Solicitors: There are also many employment law solicitors who specialize in advising workers on their rights and options in the event of redundancy.

  8. Government agencies: The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and Jobcentre Plus can provide information and support on unemployment benefits and job-seeking services.

It’s important to note that the specific support available to laid-off employees will depend on their individual circumstances, and they are encouraged to seek advice from relevant organizations and government agencies to determine what support is available to them.

Re-employment rights of redundant workers

In the UK, workers who have been made redundant have certain re-employment rights, which include:

  1. Right to be offered suitable alternative employment: If the employer has suitable alternative employment available, the employee has the right to be offered it, provided that the new job is appropriate for their skills and experience. If the employee accepts the offer of alternative employment, their redundancy will be treated as if it had not taken place.

  2. Right to be considered for future vacancies: If the employer has future vacancies, the employee has the right to be considered for them, providing they meet the necessary qualifications and skills for the job.

  3. Right to a fair selection process: The employee has the right to a fair selection process when being considered for alternative employment or future vacancies, and this process should not discriminate against the employee based on their age, race, gender, or any other protected characteristic.

  4. Right to be informed of the reasons for redundancy: The employee has the right to be informed of the reasons for their redundancy, and the employer should provide them with a written statement explaining the circumstances of the redundancy.

Appealing the redundancy decision

In the UK, a worker has the right to appeal a redundancy decision if they believe that it was unfair or not carried out in accordance with the proper procedure. The specific steps to follow and the time limit for appealing will depend on the individual circumstances of the case, but generally, an employee can raise their concerns with their employer and request a meeting to discuss the matter. If the matter is not resolved at this stage, the employee may be able to escalate the issue to an employment tribunal.

To be eligible to bring a case to an employment tribunal, the worker must have been employed for at least two years. If the worker is not eligible, they may still be able to raise their concerns with ACAS (Advisory, Conciliation, and Arbitration Service), which may be able to help resolve the dispute.

Workers are encouraged to seek advice from relevant organizations and government agencies to determine their specific rights and options for appealing a redundancy decision.

Claim for unfair dismissal

In the UK, a worker can pursue a claim for unfair dismissal if they believe that their redundancy was not carried out fairly or in accordance with the proper procedure. The steps to follow for pursuing a claim for unfair dismissal are as follows:

  1. Raise the issue with the employer: The worker should first raise their concerns with their employer and request a meeting to discuss the matter.

  2. Submit a grievance: If the matter is not resolved at this stage, the worker may be able to submit a grievance in writing to their employer, setting out their concerns and the reasons for their claim.

  3. ACAS early conciliation: If the matter is not resolved through the grievance process, the worker may be able to pursue a claim for unfair dismissal through ACAS. This agency provides free and impartial advice on employment law and can help resolve disputes between employers and employees.

  4. Employment tribunal: If the matter is not resolved through ACAS early conciliation, the worker may be able to bring a claim for unfair dismissal to an employment tribunal.

Conclusion

It is important for workers to understand the redundancy and layoff process, as well as their rights and entitlements, in order to be informed and prepared in the event that they are made redundant. This includes knowing their eligibility for redundancy pay, their rights to appeal a redundancy decision, and the support available to them, such as unemployment benefits and job-seeking services.

By being informed and prepared, workers are better equipped to handle the emotional and financial impact of redundancy and can take the necessary steps to secure their future, such as pursuing a claim for unfair dismissal if necessary. Additionally, being informed about the redundancy and layoff process can help workers to negotiate a better settlement, such as a higher redundancy pay or a more favorable notice period.

In conclusion, understanding the redundancy and layoff process in the UK is essential for workers to be informed and prepared in the event of job loss, and to ensure that their rights and entitlements are protected.

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